MENU

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month in March: Prevention, Detection and Treatment Options

poster_8e22454f5f3547cd927f30844191f173.png
Fresh Living - Intermountain Healthcare - Colo-rectal Cancer

(KUTV) March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month and Fresh Living shared details on Prevention, Detection and Treatment Options.

Dr. Tae Kim, MD is oncology surgeon at Intermountain LDS Hospital and he sat down with Casey and Holly.

Colorectal cancer screening saves lives. It is one of only a few cancers that can be prevented through screening; among cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. The risk of developing colorectal cancer increases with advancing age. More than 90 percent of cases occur in people aged 50 or older. Building awareness is an important part of helping to increase screening and decrease mortality rates.

Among cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon or rectum) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Every year, about 140,000 Americans are diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and more than 50,000 people die from it. But this disease is highly preventable, by getting screened beginning at age 50.

Screening tests help prevent colorectal cancer by finding precancerous polyps (abnormal growths) so they can be removed. Screening also finds this cancer early, when treatment can be most effective.

What You Can Do:

  • If you’re aged 50 to 75, get screened for colorectal cancer regularly. If you’re between 76 and 85, ask your doctor if you should be screened.
  • Be physically active.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Don’t drink too much alcohol.
  • Don’t smoke.

Fast Facts:

  • Risk increases with age. More than 90% of colorectal cancers occur in people aged 50 and older.
  • Precancerous polyps and colorectal cancer don’t always cause symptoms, especially at first. You could have polyps or colorectal cancer and not know it. That is why having a screening test is so important.

If you have symptoms, they may include—

  • Blood in or on the stool (bowel movement).
  • Stomach pain, aches, or cramps that do not go away.
  • Losing weight and you don’t know why.

These symptoms may be caused by something other than cancer. If you have any of them, see your doctor. Some people are at a higher risk than others for developing colorectal cancer. If you think you may be at high risk, talk to your doctor about when and how often to get tested.

There are several screening test options. Talk with your doctor about which is right for you.

  • Colonoscopy (every 10 years).
  • High-sensitivity guaiac fecal occult blood test (FOBT) or fecal immunochemical test (FIT) (every year).
  • Sigmoidoscopy (every 10 years, with FOBT or FIT every three years).
  • Sigmoidoscopy alone (every 5 years).
  • Stool DNA test (FIT-DNA) every one or three years.
  • CT colonography (or virtual colonoscopy) every five years.

For more information, visit intermountainhealthcare.org

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER