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Baby Your Baby: Special Care Nursery

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PUBLISH 9/8 @ 5PM - Baby Your Baby: Special Care Nursery (Photo:KUTV)

(KUTV) Advanced care is necessary for some babies after birth. This can take place in a NICU or what’s called a special care nursery. For mother of five, Brittany Brown, her most recent pregnancy with twins posed some challenges such as preterm labor at 23 weeks. This is why she chose to receive care at LDS Hospital’s Special Care Nursery.

“My biggest thing was my doctor. I had already had a lot of complication through this pregnancy and so my biggest thing was I wanted to stay with her,” says Brittany.

There are three types of nurseries: well-baby, special care, and a level 3 NICU.

“Here at LDS Hospital we’re a Level 2b. So we can take babies up to two months early,” says Shamar Lejardi, Registered Nurse and Nurse Manager at LDS Hospital’s Special Care Nursery.

With prescribed bed rest, Brittany was able to pass the 32-week mark. Her twins were born at 33-weeks, and since they were premature Brittany knew they would likely require some additional care. Special care nurseries are prepared for resuscitation, respiratory care, even ventilators.

“We can provide like 90% of care that a level 3 NICU can provide,” says Lejardi.

They also provide IV fluids and help premature babies develop necessary skills like feeding.

For Brittany’s twins, there were some milestones they had to reach before they could go home. These included holding their own body temperature, gaining weight, and their biggest obstacle, taking their own feedings. To help with this, Brittany and other special care nursery moms who are nursing a baby have access to an extended stay room which is located right by the nursery.

“We’re going to try to keep your baby with you at this hospital and provide you with that individualized care that you want,” says Lejardi.

If a baby needs higher level care, there are two options available. They can either transport to another facility or call in telehealth support and call in directly to a neonatologist.


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