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Senate backs effort to restore 'net neutrality'

Jim Teece, president and CEO of Ashland Home Net, says people should consider their internet use like any other utility — the more you use, the more you pay. Ashland Home Net does not plan to change its offerings, however, if regulations on net neutrality are rolled back. [Mail tribune / Andy Atkinson]

The Latest:

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on a Senate vote to repeal a rule from the Federal Communications Commission that scrapped Obama-era net-neutrality requirements. (all times local):

3:30 p.m.

The Senate has voted to kill a Federal Communications Commission rule that repealed the Obama administration's ban on internet providers blocking or slowing down certain content.

Back in December, the FCC repealed "net neutrality" rules that ensured equal treatment for all web traffic.

The Obama-era rule prevented providers such as AT&T, Comcast and Verizon from interfering with internet traffic and favoring their own sites and apps. Critics, including the Trump administration, said over-regulation was stifling innovation.

Three Republicans joined with Democrats in voting to repeal the FCC rule that was scheduled to go into effect next month. The final vote was 52-47.

Democrats are hoping to energize young voters who support the principle of net neutrality, though the GOP-controlled House is unlikely to go along with the effort.

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1 p.m.

The Senate is poised to approve legislation designed to reverse the Federal Communications Commission's effort to deregulate the internet.

Back in December, the FCC repealed an Obama-era rule known as "net neutrality" rule, junking the principle of equal treatment for all web traffic.

The rule had prevented providers such as AT&T, Comcast and Verizon from interfering with internet traffic and favoring their own sites and apps.

Telecommunications companies lobbied hard to overturn the rule, saying it discouraged investment and innovation.

The Senate is expected to pass a resolution from Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., that would reverse the FCC's decision. But the House isn't likely to take it up.

Still, Democrats see their effort as something that will energize young voters who value unfettered access to the internet.

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