Utah woman says medical marijuana changed her life; doctor says it's not for everybody


    Vanessa Kyrobie did not want to use medical marijuana in Utah until it was legal, and said in the last six weeks it’s been life-changing. (Photo: KUTV)

    Vanessa Kyrobie did not want to use medical marijuana in Utah until it was legal, and said in the last six weeks it’s been life-changing.

    A Cache County MD cautioned, while responses to medical cannabis have been “reasonably decent,” it is not for everyone.

    Kyrobie is a young wife and mother of two children, who said a bacterial brain infection left her with pain, nausea, sleep problems and other debilitating symptoms.

    Vanessa Kyrobie did not want to use medical marijuana in Utah until it was legal, and said in the last six weeks it’s been life-changing. (Photo: KUTV)

    “The pain in my body was beyond unbearable, level eight, nine, 10,” Kyrobie said, adding at one point, she was essentially bed-ridden, and contemplated suicide. “I honestly feel if it wasn’t for medical marijuana, I wouldn’t be here.”

    She said she began vaping marijuana and taking drops and gummies after Proposition 2 passed, and the state legislature enacted a legal medical marijuana bill more to its liking.

    She said she took nine different medications every day before starting her three-times-a-day marijuana treatment.

    Vanessa Kyrobie did not want to use medical marijuana in Utah until it was legal, and said in the last six weeks it’s been life-changing. (Photo: KUTV)

    “Gabapentin was for nerve pain, Microzene was for nerve pain,” Kyrobie explained, as she placed pill bottles on her dining room table. “I haven’t used any of these since switching to medical marijuana.”

    Dr. Ed Redd — not her physician — but a Cache County MD and GOP state representative, said he has discussed medical marijuana as an option with up to 10 patients since the law took effect, but has spoken to many more who have used much longer.

    “They’ve had some reasonably decent responses to it,” he said, but quickly added, “not all of them have. Some of them have come in and told me it didn’t help at all, or it made it worse, made them sick.”

    Vanessa Kyrobie did not want to use medical marijuana in Utah until it was legal, and said in the last six weeks it’s been life-changing. (Photo: KUTV)

    After a meeting of the Utah Cannabinoid Product Board on Wednesday morning, Redd said medical marijuana can have positive reactions for PTSD, chronic pain, and vomiting brought on by chemotherapy.

    He also said it can be detrimental to people who have mental illness or a predisposition to it.

    “Some people who smoke cannabis actually have paranoia, actually get more agitated, and, actually, psychotic,” he said.

    Redd said if patients discuss medical marijuana with their medical providers, and then get it across state lines and bring it to Utah, they should — under the new law — not be prosecuted.

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